Program

Please note the program is subject to change.

08:00 – 16:00

Level 5 Foyer – Registration Open


09:00 – 10:30

Room 518BC - Full Day Workshop - Guided Playful Learning: Developmental, Computational, and Educational Perspectives

Emily N. Daubert and Patrick Shafto

Learning is a continuous process that is contingent on temporal, developmental, and social factors. Recently, guided playful learning has been put forth as an integrative child-led, adult-assisted approach that addresses these factors and promotes learning. Research in cognitive development has focused on elucidating the underlying cognitive mechanisms that lead to changes in children’s knowledge. In computational modeling, researchers have sought to formalize models of guided playful learning by drawing from active learning and instruction literatures. Finally, educational researchers have explored the roles of individual differences and learning domains on the effectiveness of guided playful learning. The goal of this workshop is to unite an interdisciplinary group of researchers, with expertise in cognitive development, computation, and education in order to develop a unified theoretical and empirical understanding of the interplay of temporal, developmental, and social factors involved in guided playful learning.

Room 519AB - Full Day Workshop - Heuristics, Hacks, and Habits: Boundedly Optimal Approaches to Learning, Reasoning, and Decision Making

Ishita Dasgupta, Eric Schulz, Jessica Hamrick, and Josh Tenenbaum

This workshop will cover work that casts human and machine learning, decision making and reasoning as boundedly optimal. In particularly, we will focus on meta-reasoning, reinforcement learning, active information acquisition, and probabilistic reasoning.

Room 521ABC - Half Day Workshop - Using Replication Studies to Teach Research Methods in Cognitive Science

Joshua de Leeuw, Jan Andrews, Michael Franke, Josh Hartshorne, Robert Hawkins, Ken Livingston, & Jordan Wagge

Some instructors of research methods classes are conducting authentic (i.e., publishable) replication studies with their classes. This practice has, potentially, both pedagogical benefits for the students and broader benefits for science. There are also many challenges to successfully pulling it off. With the growing adoption of this practice, a diverse set of approaches that have been used in the classroom now exists. This creates the possibility for sharing, synthesizing, and improving teaching strategies, which is the goal of this workshop. This workshop brings together instructors who have conducted replications with their classes, at both the undergraduate and graduate level, to discuss their successes and failures. We hope that workshop attendees will leave with concrete ideas for how to incorporate replication work into their own research methods classes.

Room 524A - Half Day Tutorial - Optimizing the Design of an Experiment using the ADOpy Package: An Introduction and Tutorial

Jay Myung, Mark Pitt, Jaeyeong Yang, and Woo-Young Ahn

How can researchers make experiments more efficient without sacrificing precision of measurement? Creative approaches, such as adaptive (staircase) methods in psychophysics, have been proposed as a solution. Advances in Bayesian statistics offer algorithm-based ways to achieve the same ends. The first part of this tutorial provides a conceptual introduction to one such approach, adaptive design optimization (ADO), along with examples of its application. The second part consists of a tutorial that introduces, in a hands-on training environment, an open-source Python package, ADOpy, that contains the ADO engine. The package was written using high-level modular-based commands such that users can use the package without having to understand the computational details of the ADO algorithm. The package is available from GitHub with three pre-installed experimental tasks in psychophysics, delay discounting, and risky choice. Converting a non-ADO task into an ADO-based task is straightforward, which will be demonstrated with working examples in PsychoPy.

Visit the tutorial web page here: https://sites.google.com/view/adopytutorial/

Room 524B - Half Day Tutorial - EMHMM: Eye Movement Analysis with Hidden Markov Models and Its Applications in Cognitive Research

Janet H. Hsiao and Antoni B. Chan

Recent studies have reported substantial individual differences in eye movements during cognitive tasks. To quantitatively measure these differences, Chuk, Chan, and Hsiao (2014) have developed the Eye Movement analysis with Hidden Markov Models (EMHMM) approach (Matlab Toolbox available at http://visal.cs.cityu.edu.hk/research/emhmm/). Each individual’s eye movement pattern is summarized using a hidden Markov model (HMM), including person-specific regions of interest (ROIs) and transition probabilities among these ROIs. Individual HMMs are clustered to discover common patterns. Differences among individual patterns are quantified through similarity measures with the common patterns. This approach has been applied to face recognition research and made discoveries thus far not revealed by other methods. New methodologies for tasks involving cognitive state changes and stimuli with different feature layouts have also been developed. We will first introduce EMHMM and its applications with a short demo, followed by a tutorial with recommendations and sample data for attendees to have hands-on experience.

Room 524C - Half Day Tutorial - Daylong Data: Raw Audio to Transcript via Automated and Manual Open-Science Tools

John Bunce, Elika Bergelson, Anne Warlaumont, and Marisa Casillas

Several of the central questions in language, social cognition, and developmental research focus on the roles of input, output, and interaction on learning and communication. While it has become easy to collect long-form recordings, getting useful data out of them is a more daunting task. Across four mini-sessions, this tutorial aims to address pre- and post-data collection concerns, and provide a hands-on introduction to manual and automated annotation techniques. Attendees will leave this tutorial with resources and concrete experience for collecting, annotating, and sharing/archiving naturalistic recordings, including specific open-science practices relevant for these data.

Room 522ABC - Full Day Tutorial - Quantum Theory in Cognitive Modeling

Emmanuel Pothos, James Yearsley, Zheng Joyce Wang, Peter Kvam, and Jerome Busemeyer

Even though the generally acknowledged normative and descriptive standard for modeling human inference is classical/ Bayesian probability theory (CPT), there have also been several reports which challenge CPT’s universal applicability. Some of the most influential empirical demonstrations of such so-called fallacies have been reported by Kahneman, Tversky and their collaborators. For example, consider the evocative conjunction fallacy. In the Tentori et al. (2004) demonstration of the conjunction fallacy, participants are quite happy to consider it more probable to randomly select a Scandinavian person with both blue eyes and blond hair, than just blond hair. Even though we can imagine a line-up of Scandinavian individuals (making the set theoretic structure of CPT explicit and so the impossibility of a conjunction fallacy), there just seems a persistent feeling that somehow the conjunction is more likely than the marginal (cf. Gilboa, 2000). How can our intuition be so much at odds with CPT prescription? We call quantum probability theory (QPT) the rules for how to assign probabilities to events from quantum mechanics, without any of the physics. QPT is in principle applicable in any situation where there is a need to formalize uncertainty. In psychology, one way to motivate QPT is as a bounded rationality approach to CPT: whereas in CPT we require conjunctions/ disjunctions across all possible questions (and the underlying logical structure is a Boolean algebra), in QPT (classical) conjunctions/ disjunctions are possible only for so-called compatible questions, while for incompatible ones they are undefined (they have to be computed with sequential operations; the underlying logical structure is a partial Boolean algebra).


10:30 – 11:00

Level 5 Foyer – Morning Break


11:00 – 12:00

Room 518BC - Full Day Workshop - Guided Playful Learning: Developmental, Computational, and Educational Perspectives

Emily N. Daubert and Patrick Shafto

Learning is a continuous process that is contingent on temporal, developmental, and social factors. Recently, guided playful learning has been put forth as an integrative child-led, adult-assisted approach that addresses these factors and promotes learning. Research in cognitive development has focused on elucidating the underlying cognitive mechanisms that lead to changes in children’s knowledge. In computational modeling, researchers have sought to formalize models of guided playful learning by drawing from active learning and instruction literatures. Finally, educational researchers have explored the roles of individual differences and learning domains on the effectiveness of guided playful learning. The goal of this workshop is to unite an interdisciplinary group of researchers, with expertise in cognitive development, computation, and education in order to develop a unified theoretical and empirical understanding of the interplay of temporal, developmental, and social factors involved in guided playful learning.

Room 519AB - Full Day Workshop - Heuristics, Hacks, and Habits: Boundedly Optimal Approaches to Learning, Reasoning, and Decision Making

Ishita Dasgupta, Eric Schulz, Jessica Hamrick, and Josh Tenenbaum

This workshop will cover work that casts human and machine learning, decision making and reasoning as boundedly optimal. In particularly, we will focus on meta-reasoning, reinforcement learning, active information acquisition, and probabilistic reasoning.

Room 521ABC - Half Day Workshop - Using Replication Studies to Teach Research Methods in Cognitive Science

Joshua de Leeuw, Jan Andrews, Michael Franke, Josh Hartshorne, Robert Hawkins, Ken Livingston, & Jordan Wagge

Some instructors of research methods classes are conducting authentic (i.e., publishable) replication studies with their classes. This practice has, potentially, both pedagogical benefits for the students and broader benefits for science. There are also many challenges to successfully pulling it off. With the growing adoption of this practice, a diverse set of approaches that have been used in the classroom now exists. This creates the possibility for sharing, synthesizing, and improving teaching strategies, which is the goal of this workshop. This workshop brings together instructors who have conducted replications with their classes, at both the undergraduate and graduate level, to discuss their successes and failures. We hope that workshop attendees will leave with concrete ideas for how to incorporate replication work into their own research methods classes.

Room 524A - Half Day Tutorial - Optimizing the Design of an Experiment using the ADOpy Package: An Introduction and Tutorial

Jay Myung, Mark Pitt, Jaeyeong Yang, and Woo-Young Ahn

How can researchers make experiments more efficient without sacrificing precision of measurement? Creative approaches, such as adaptive (staircase) methods in psychophysics, have been proposed as a solution. Advances in Bayesian statistics offer algorithm-based ways to achieve the same ends. The first part of this tutorial provides a conceptual introduction to one such approach, adaptive design optimization (ADO), along with examples of its application. The second part consists of a tutorial that introduces, in a hands-on training environment, an open-source Python package, ADOpy, that contains the ADO engine. The package was written using high-level modular-based commands such that users can use the package without having to understand the computational details of the ADO algorithm. The package is available from GitHub with three pre-installed experimental tasks in psychophysics, delay discounting, and risky choice. Converting a non-ADO task into an ADO-based task is straightforward, which will be demonstrated with working examples in PsychoPy.

Room 524B - Half Day Tutorial - EMHMM: Eye Movement Analysis with Hidden Markov Models and Its Applications in Cognitive Research

Janet H. Hsiao and Antoni B. Chan

Recent studies have reported substantial individual differences in eye movements during cognitive tasks. To quantitatively measure these differences, Chuk, Chan, and Hsiao (2014) have developed the Eye Movement analysis with Hidden Markov Models (EMHMM) approach (Matlab Toolbox available at http://visal.cs.cityu.edu.hk/research/emhmm/). Each individual’s eye movement pattern is summarized using a hidden Markov model (HMM), including person-specific regions of interest (ROIs) and transition probabilities among these ROIs. Individual HMMs are clustered to discover common patterns. Differences among individual patterns are quantified through similarity measures with the common patterns. This approach has been applied to face recognition research and made discoveries thus far not revealed by other methods. New methodologies for tasks involving cognitive state changes and stimuli with different feature layouts have also been developed. We will first introduce EMHMM and its applications with a short demo, followed by a tutorial with recommendations and sample data for attendees to have hands-on experience.

Room 524C - Half Day Tutorial - Daylong Data: Raw Audio to Transcript via Automated and Manual Open-Science Tools

John Bunce, Elika Bergelson, Anne Warlaumont, and Marisa Casillas

Several of the central questions in language, social cognition, and developmental research focus on the roles of input, output, and interaction on learning and communication. While it has become easy to collect long-form recordings, getting useful data out of them is a more daunting task. Across four mini-sessions, this tutorial aims to address pre- and post-data collection concerns, and provide a hands-on introduction to manual and automated annotation techniques. Attendees will leave this tutorial with resources and concrete experience for collecting, annotating, and sharing/archiving naturalistic recordings, including specific open-science practices relevant for these data.

Room 522ABC - Full Day Tutorial - Quantum Theory in Cognitive Modeling

Emmanuel Pothos, James Yearsley, Zheng Joyce Wang, Peter Kvam, and Jerome Busemeyer

Even though the generally acknowledged normative and descriptive standard for modeling human inference is classical/ Bayesian probability theory (CPT), there have also been several reports which challenge CPT’s universal applicability. Some of the most influential empirical demonstrations of such so-called fallacies have been reported by Kahneman, Tversky and their collaborators. For example, consider the evocative conjunction fallacy. In the Tentori et al. (2004) demonstration of the conjunction fallacy, participants are quite happy to consider it more probable to randomly select a Scandinavian person with both blue eyes and blond hair, than just blond hair. Even though we can imagine a line-up of Scandinavian individuals (making the set theoretic structure of CPT explicit and so the impossibility of a conjunction fallacy), there just seems a persistent feeling that somehow the conjunction is more likely than the marginal (cf. Gilboa, 2000). How can our intuition be so much at odds with CPT prescription? We call quantum probability theory (QPT) the rules for how to assign probabilities to events from quantum mechanics, without any of the physics. QPT is in principle applicable in any situation where there is a need to formalize uncertainty. In psychology, one way to motivate QPT is as a bounded rationality approach to CPT: whereas in CPT we require conjunctions/ disjunctions across all possible questions (and the underlying logical structure is a Boolean algebra), in QPT (classical) conjunctions/ disjunctions are possible only for so-called compatible questions, while for incompatible ones they are undefined (they have to be computed with sequential operations; the underlying logical structure is a partial Boolean algebra).


12:00 – 13:00pm

Lunch Break (ON YOUR OWN)


13:00 – 14:30

Room 518BC - Full Day Workshop - Guided Playful Learning: Developmental, Computational, and Educational Perspectives

Emily N. Daubert and Patrick Shafto

Learning is a continuous process that is contingent on temporal, developmental, and social factors. Recently, guided playful learning has been put forth as an integrative child-led, adult-assisted approach that addresses these factors and promotes learning. Research in cognitive development has focused on elucidating the underlying cognitive mechanisms that lead to changes in children’s knowledge. In computational modeling, researchers have sought to formalize models of guided playful learning by drawing from active learning and instruction literatures. Finally, educational researchers have explored the roles of individual differences and learning domains on the effectiveness of guided playful learning. The goal of this workshop is to unite an interdisciplinary group of researchers, with expertise in cognitive development, computation, and education in order to develop a unified theoretical and empirical understanding of the interplay of temporal, developmental, and social factors involved in guided playful learning.

Room 519AB - Full Day Workshop - Heuristics, Hacks, and Habits: Boundedly Optimal Approaches to Learning, Reasoning, and Decision Making

Ishita Dasgupta, Eric Schulz, Jessica Hamrick, and Josh Tenenbaum

This workshop will cover work that casts human and machine learning, decision making and reasoning as boundedly optimal. In particularly, we will focus on meta-reasoning, reinforcement learning, active information acquisition, and probabilistic reasoning.

Room 521ABC - Half Day Workshop - Everyday Activities

Holger Schultheis and Richard P. Cooper

Successful completion of everyday activities (EA; e.g., setting the table) requires the coordination of a range of cognitive abilities (perception, short-term memory, action planning, monitoring, etc.). EA are circumscribed enough to be studied within the lab, but are also prone to specific errors throughout development and characteristic breakdown following neural injury or degeneration. Accordingly, investigation of EA has the potential to both deepen our understanding of the cognitive processes involved, and of their integration. Moreover, a better understanding of EA has applied relevance. Given demographic changes, supporting EA throughout ageing and following neural dysfunction is becoming increasingly important. Only with sufficient understanding of what drives successful EA, for example, can the necessary support (e.g., developing specific training or enabling robots to take over EA) be provided to an aging population or to patients living with brain injury. This workshop will foster that understanding through talks and poster presentations.

Room 524A - Half Day Workshop - Measuring Creativity

Ana-Maria Olteteanu

Various methods exist for measuring creativity, most of them in the form of creativity tests, like the Remote Associates Test, the Alternative Uses Test, TTCT, the Wallach-Kogan tests, insight problems, etc. However, the feasibility and dependability of various types of psychometric assessment and administration of measures has recently been questioned and enriched. Thought and work on the measurement of creativity are currently witnessing a new revival.

This workshop will focus on the current state of creativity psychometrics, integrating topics on classical and novel, manual and computational methods of testing and measuring creativity. Various questions will be addressed, from the strengths and weaknesses of existing creativity measuring methods, to comparability across creativity test item sets and the impact of artificial cognitive systems and their evalution on creativity metrics.

Room 524B - Half Day Workshop - Beyond the Ivory Tower: Non-Academic Career Paths for Cognitive Scientists

Vanessa R. Simmering and Carissa L. Shafto

Cognitive science research has far-reaching implications, but many graduate students are trained only for academic careers. Academic skills such as research, publishing, grant-writing, teaching, and mentoring have direct application in non-academic positions, but pre- and post-doctoral training often does not address how such skills translate to other careers. Scholars interested in non-academic employment options may not know where to turn for guidance. This professional development workshop fills this gap, providing the opportunity to (1) learn about the process of finding and applying for appropriate positions, (2) develop a way to present their skills and interest to prospective employers, and (3) network with other scholars in similar situations. The session will be led by Dr. Carissa Shafto (data scientist, Brightfield Strategies) and Dr. Vanessa Simmering (research scientist, ACT, Inc.) who have previously worked in academic positions, providing them with insights into the similarities and differences in these career paths.

Room 524C - Half Day Workshop - Predicting Individual Human Reasoning: The PRECORE-Challenge

Marco Ragni, Nicolas Riesterer, and Sangeet Khemlani

We organize a cognitive modeling challenge about human syllogistic reasoning. Anyone can participate and provide predictive models. Syllogistic Reasoning consists of 64 problems of the form “All A are B; All B are C”. Each premise contains a single quantifier of “All”, “Some”, “No”, and “Some … not”. A response relates the terms of the quantifiers (i.e., A and C in the example) via one of the four quantifiers or “No Valid Conclusion”. A recent meta-analysis (Khemlani & Johnson-Laird, 2012) compiled a list of theoretical accounts of syllogistic reasoning. Still, even though performing well on aggregated data, they are unable to successfully predict individual responses. The challenge will be based on an evaluative framework we developed over the course of the last months (CCOBRA -https://github.com/CognitiveComputationLab/ccobra). In the workshop, the different approaches are presented, discussed, and finally ranked in accordance to an evaluation on unpublished data.

Room 522ABC - Full Day Tutorial - Quantum Theory in Cognitive Modeling

Emmanuel Pothos, James Yearsley, Zheng Joyce Wang, Peter Kvam, and Jerome Busemeyer

Even though the generally acknowledged normative and descriptive standard for modeling human inference is classical/ Bayesian probability theory (CPT), there have also been several reports which challenge CPT’s universal applicability. Some of the most influential empirical demonstrations of such so-called fallacies have been reported by Kahneman, Tversky and their collaborators. For example, consider the evocative conjunction fallacy. In the Tentori et al. (2004) demonstration of the conjunction fallacy, participants are quite happy to consider it more probable to randomly select a Scandinavian person with both blue eyes and blond hair, than just blond hair. Even though we can imagine a line-up of Scandinavian individuals (making the set theoretic structure of CPT explicit and so the impossibility of a conjunction fallacy), there just seems a persistent feeling that somehow the conjunction is more likely than the marginal (cf. Gilboa, 2000). How can our intuition be so much at odds with CPT prescription? We call quantum probability theory (QPT) the rules for how to assign probabilities to events from quantum mechanics, without any of the physics. QPT is in principle applicable in any situation where there is a need to formalize uncertainty. In psychology, one way to motivate QPT is as a bounded rationality approach to CPT: whereas in CPT we require conjunctions/ disjunctions across all possible questions (and the underlying logical structure is a Boolean algebra), in QPT (classical) conjunctions/ disjunctions are possible only for so-called compatible questions, while for incompatible ones they are undefined (they have to be computed with sequential operations; the underlying logical structure is a partial Boolean algebra).


14:30 – 15:00

Level 5 Foyer – Afternoon Break


15:00 – 16:00

Room 518BC - Full Day Workshop - Guided Playful Learning: Developmental, Computational, and Educational Perspectives

Emily N. Daubert and Patrick Shafto

Learning is a continuous process that is contingent on temporal, developmental, and social factors. Recently, guided playful learning has been put forth as an integrative child-led, adult-assisted approach that addresses these factors and promotes learning. Research in cognitive development has focused on elucidating the underlying cognitive mechanisms that lead to changes in children’s knowledge. In computational modeling, researchers have sought to formalize models of guided playful learning by drawing from active learning and instruction literatures. Finally, educational researchers have explored the roles of individual differences and learning domains on the effectiveness of guided playful learning. The goal of this workshop is to unite an interdisciplinary group of researchers, with expertise in cognitive development, computation, and education in order to develop a unified theoretical and empirical understanding of the interplay of temporal, developmental, and social factors involved in guided playful learning.

Room 519AB - Full Day Workshop - Heuristics, Hacks, and Habits: Boundedly Optimal Approaches to Learning, Reasoning, and Decision Making

Ishita Dasgupta, Eric Schulz, Jessica Hamrick, and Josh Tenenbaum

This workshop will cover work that casts human and machine learning, decision making and reasoning as boundedly optimal. In particularly, we will focus on meta-reasoning, reinforcement learning, active information acquisition, and probabilistic reasoning.

Room 521ABC - Half Day Workshop - Everyday Activities

Holger Schultheis and Richard P. Cooper

Successful completion of everyday activities (EA; e.g., setting the table) requires the coordination of a range of cognitive abilities (perception, short-term memory, action planning, monitoring, etc.). EA are circumscribed enough to be studied within the lab, but are also prone to specific errors throughout development and characteristic breakdown following neural injury or degeneration. Accordingly, investigation of EA has the potential to both deepen our understanding of the cognitive processes involved, and of their integration. Moreover, a better understanding of EA has applied relevance. Given demographic changes, supporting EA throughout ageing and following neural dysfunction is becoming increasingly important. Only with sufficient understanding of what drives successful EA, for example, can the necessary support (e.g., developing specific training or enabling robots to take over EA) be provided to an aging population or to patients living with brain injury. This workshop will foster that understanding through talks and poster presentations.

Room 524A - Half Day Workshop - Measuring Creativity

Ana-Maria Olteteanu

Various methods exist for measuring creativity, most of them in the form of creativity tests, like the Remote Associates Test, the Alternative Uses Test, TTCT, the Wallach-Kogan tests, insight problems, etc. However, the feasibility and dependability of various types of psychometric assessment and administration of measures has recently been questioned and enriched. Thought and work on the measurement of creativity are currently witnessing a new revival.

This workshop will focus on the current state of creativity psychometrics, integrating topics on classical and novel, manual and computational methods of testing and measuring creativity. Various questions will be addressed, from the strengths and weaknesses of existing creativity measuring methods, to comparability across creativity test item sets and the impact of artificial cognitive systems and their evalution on creativity metrics.

Room 524B - Half Day Workshop - Beyond the Ivory Tower: Non-Academic Career Paths for Cognitive Scientists

Vanessa R. Simmering and Carissa L. Shafto

Cognitive science research has far-reaching implications, but many graduate students are trained only for academic careers. Academic skills such as research, publishing, grant-writing, teaching, and mentoring have direct application in non-academic positions, but pre- and post-doctoral training often does not address how such skills translate to other careers. Scholars interested in non-academic employment options may not know where to turn for guidance. This professional development workshop fills this gap, providing the opportunity to (1) learn about the process of finding and applying for appropriate positions, (2) develop a way to present their skills and interest to prospective employers, and (3) network with other scholars in similar situations. The session will be led by Dr. Carissa Shafto (data scientist, Brightfield Strategies) and Dr. Vanessa Simmering (research scientist, ACT, Inc.) who have previously worked in academic positions, providing them with insights into the similarities and differences in these career paths.

Room 524C - Half Day Workshop - Predicting Individual Human Reasoning: The PRECORE-Challenge

Marco Ragni, Nicolas Riesterer, and Sangeet Khemlani

We organize a cognitive modeling challenge about human syllogistic reasoning. Anyone can participate and provide predictive models. Syllogistic Reasoning consists of 64 problems of the form “All A are B; All B are C”. Each premise contains a single quantifier of “All”, “Some”, “No”, and “Some … not”. A response relates the terms of the quantifiers (i.e., A and C in the example) via one of the four quantifiers or “No Valid Conclusion”. A recent meta-analysis (Khemlani & Johnson-Laird, 2012) compiled a list of theoretical accounts of syllogistic reasoning. Still, even though performing well on aggregated data, they are unable to successfully predict individual responses. The challenge will be based on an evaluative framework we developed over the course of the last months (CCOBRA -https://github.com/CognitiveComputationLab/ccobra). In the workshop, the different approaches are presented, discussed, and finally ranked in accordance to an evaluation on unpublished data.

Room 522ABC - Full Day Tutorial - Quantum Theory in Cognitive Modeling

Emmanuel Pothos, James Yearsley, Zheng Joyce Wang, Peter Kvam, and Jerome Busemeyer

Even though the generally acknowledged normative and descriptive standard for modeling human inference is classical/ Bayesian probability theory (CPT), there have also been several reports which challenge CPT’s universal applicability. Some of the most influential empirical demonstrations of such so-called fallacies have been reported by Kahneman, Tversky and their collaborators. For example, consider the evocative conjunction fallacy. In the Tentori et al. (2004) demonstration of the conjunction fallacy, participants are quite happy to consider it more probable to randomly select a Scandinavian person with both blue eyes and blond hair, than just blond hair. Even though we can imagine a line-up of Scandinavian individuals (making the set theoretic structure of CPT explicit and so the impossibility of a conjunction fallacy), there just seems a persistent feeling that somehow the conjunction is more likely than the marginal (cf. Gilboa, 2000). How can our intuition be so much at odds with CPT prescription? We call quantum probability theory (QPT) the rules for how to assign probabilities to events from quantum mechanics, without any of the physics. QPT is in principle applicable in any situation where there is a need to formalize uncertainty. In psychology, one way to motivate QPT is as a bounded rationality approach to CPT: whereas in CPT we require conjunctions/ disjunctions across all possible questions (and the underlying logical structure is a Boolean algebra), in QPT (classical) conjunctions/ disjunctions are possible only for so-called compatible questions, while for incompatible ones they are undefined (they have to be computed with sequential operations; the underlying logical structure is a partial Boolean algebra).

07:30 – 17:00

Level 5 Foyer – Registration Open


08:30 – 09:00

Plenary Room 517D – Introduction & Welcome


09:00 – 10:00

Plenary Room 517D - Keynote: Computational Models of Creativity: Curiosity Novelty, and Surprise

Mary Lou Maher, University of North Carolina


09:00 – 17:00

Level 5 Foyer – Exhibits Open


10:00 – 10:20

Level 5 Foyer – Morning Break


10:20 – 12:00

Room 521ABC - Paper Session 1 – Language in Social Contexts

Action Prediction During Real-time Social Interactions In Infancy – Claire Monroy, Chi-hsin Chen, Derek Houston, Chen Yu

Examining The Multimodal Effects Of Parent Speech In Parent-infant Interactions – Sara E. Schroer, Linda Smith, Chen Yu

Parents Calibrate Speech To Their Children’s Vocabulary Knowledge – Ashley, C, Leung, Alexandra E. Tunkel, Dan Yurovsky

Onomatopoeias, Gestures, Actions And Words: How Do Caregivers Use Multimodal Cues In Their Communication To Children? – Gabriella Vigliocco, Margherita Murgiano, Yasamin Motamedi, Elizabeth

Room 519A - Paper Session 2 – Memory Encoding

Semantic Categories Of Artifacts And Animals Reflect Efficient Coding – Noga Zaslavsky, Terry Regier, Naftali Tishby, Charles Kemp

Exploring The Role That Encoding And Retrieval Play In Sampling Effects – Keith James Ransom, Amy Perfors

The Effect Of Semantic Relatedness On Associative Asymmetry In Memory – Vencislav Popov, Qiong Zhang, Griffin E. Koch, Regina Calloway, Marc N. Coutanche

Semantic Influences On Episodic Memory Distortions – Alexa Tompary, Sharon L. Thompson-Schill

Room 519B - Paper Session 3 – Perception

Separating Object Resonance And Room Reverberation In Impact Sounds – Jennifer Hu, James Traer, Josh McDermott

Partitioning The Perception Of Physical And Social Events Within A Unified Psychological Space – Tianmin Shu, Yujia Peng, Hongjing Lu, Song-Chun Zhu

Unconscious Number Discrimination In The Human Visual System – Che Lucero, Geoffrey Brookshire, Roberto Bottini, Susan Goldin-Meadow Edward Vogel

Congenitally Blind Individuals’ Theories And Inferences About Object Color – Judy Kim, Lindsay Ann Yazzolino, Brianna Aheimer, Verónica Montané Manrara, Marina Bedny

Room 524A - Paper Session 4 – Explanation

Without Conceptual Information Children Miss The Boat: Examining The Role Of Explanations And Anomalous Evidence In Scientific Belief Revision – Nicole Larsen, Vaunam Venkadasalam, Patricia Ganea

Inquiry, Theory-Formation, And The Phenomenology Of Explanation – Emily, G, Liquin, Tania Lombrozo

Simulating Explanatory Coexistence: Integrated, Synthetic, And Target-Dependent Reasoning – Scott E. Friedman, Micah Goldwater

Explanatory Considerations Guide Pursuit – Patricia L. Mirabile, Tania Lombrozo

Room 524B - Paper Session 5 – Collaborative Cognition

Why Do Echo Chambers Form? The Role Of Trust, Population Heterogeneity, And Objective Truth – Amy Perfors, Danielle Navarro

Evaluating Theories Of Collaborative Cognition Using The Hawkes Process And A Large Naturalistic Data Set – Mohsen Afrasiabi, Mark G. Orr, Joseph Larry Austerweil

How Real Is Moral Contagion In Online Social Networks? – Jason, W, Burton, Nicole Cruz, Ulrike Hahn

The Evolutionary Dynamics Of Cooperation In Collective Search – Alan Novaes Tump, Charley Mingshuo Wu, Imen Bouhlel, Robert Goldstone

Room 522ABC - Paper Session 6 – Word Learning

Statistical Learning Supports Word Learning And Memory – Ferhat Karaman, Jill Lany, Jessica Fleming Hay

The Everyday Statistics Of Objects And Their Names: How Word Learning Gets Its Start – Elizabeth M. Clerkin, Linda Smith

Sampling To Learn Words: Adults And Children Sample Words That Reduce Referential Ambiguity – Martin Zettersten, Jenny Saffran

Evidence Of Error-driven Cross-situational Word Learning – Chris Grimmick, Todd M. Gureckis, George Kachergis

Room 524C - Paper Session 7 – Intention and Choice

Do Children Ascribe The Ability To Choose To Humanoid Robots? – Teresa Flanagan, Joshua Rottman, Lauren H. Howard

The Intentional Stance Toward Robots: Conceptual And Methodological Considerations – Sam Thellman, Tom Ziemke

Hard Choices: Children’s Understanding Of The Cost Of Action Selection – Shari Liu, Fiery Cushman, Samuel Gershman, Wouter Kool, Elizabeth Spelke

Productivity Depends On Communicative Intention And Accessibility, Not Thresholds – Alexia Hernandez, Sammy Floyd, Adele Goldberg

Room 525AB - Paper Session 8 – Decision Making

Frequency Effects In Decision-Making Are Predicted By Dirichlet Probability Distribution Models – Astin C. Cornwall, Darrell Worthy, Hilary J. Don,

The Impact Of Anecdotal Information On Medical Decision-making – Sara Jaramillo, Zachary Horne, Micah Goldwater

Zero-sum Reasoning In Information Selection – Toby D. Pilditch, Alice Liefgreen, David Lagnado

The Decision Science Of Voting: Behavioral Evidence Of Factors In Candidate Valuation – Janne Kauttonen, Jyrki Suomala

Room 520AD - Paper Session 9 - Publication-Based Talks – Creativity

A Cultural Evolution Framework For Human Creativity – Liane Gaboran,

On The Nature Of Creative Processes: Performativity As A Missing Algorithm – Antonio, Antonio, Pennisi, Gessica Fruciano, Giovanni Pennisi

Why Sociality Affects Creativity: Lessons From Autism – Paola Pennisi, Laura Giallongo

Modeling Human Creative Cognition Using AI Techniques – Steve DiPaola

Room 520BE - Contributed Symposium 1 - Extending Rationality

Emmanuel Pothos, Jerome Busemeyer, Tim Pleskac, James Yearsley, Josh Tenenbaum, Michael Henry Tessler, Tom Griffiths, Falk Lieder, Ralph Hertwig, Thorsten Pachur, Christina Leuker, Richard Shiffrin

Room 520CF - Contributed Symposium 2 - How Does Current AI Stack Up Against Human Intelligence?

Ken Forbus, Dedre Gentner, John. E. Laird, Thomas Shultz, Ardavan S. Nobandegani

Room 518BC - Contributed Symposium 3 - Individual Differences In Spatial Representations And Wayfinding

Thackery Brown, Alina Nazareth, Maria Brucato, Veronique Bohbot, Nora Newcombe, Daniel Voyer, Lucy Huang, Qiliang He, Jon Starnes, Sarah Goodroe Timothy.


12:00 – 13:00 Lunch Break

Plenary Room 517D – Meet the Cognitive Science Editors and Publishers


13:00 – 14:30

Room 517BC – Poster Session 1 (View Poster Program here)


14:30 – 16:10

Room 521ABC - Paper Session 10 – Neural Dynamics

Neural Dynamic Concepts For Intentional Systems – Jan Tekülve, Gregor Schöner

Towards A Neural-level Cognitive Architecture: Modeling Behavior In Working Memory Tasks With Neurons – Zoran Tiganj, Nathanael Allen, Cruzado Marc Howard

Comparing Gated And Simple Recurrent Neural Network Architectures As Models Of Human Sentence Processing – Christoph Aurnhammer, Stefan Frank

The Interaction Between Structure And Meaning In Sentence Comprehension: Recurrent Neural Networks And Reading Times – Stefan Frank, John Hoeks

Room 520BE - Paper Session 11 – Language in Context

How Do Infants Start Learning Object Names In A Sea Of Clutter? – Hadar Karmazyn Raz, Drew H. Abney, David Crandall, Chen Yu Linda Smith

Environmental Regularities Shape Semantic Organization Throughout Development – Layla Unger, Vladimir Sloutsky

A Predictability-distinctiveness Trade-off In The Historical Emergence Of Word Forms – Aotao Xu, Christian Ramiro, Yang Xu

Unexpectedness Makes A Sociolinguistic Variant Easier To Learn: An Alien language-learning Experiment – Wei Lai, Péter Rácz, Gareth Roberts

Room 519A - Paper Session 12 – Decision Processes

The Effect Of Stimulus Presentation Time On Bias: A Diffusion-model Based Analysis – Jeremy Ngo, Chris Donkin

How Much To Purchase? – A Cognitive Adaptive Decision Making Account – Percy Mistry

At The Zebra Crossing: Modelling Complex Decision Processes With Variable-Drift Diffusion Models – Oscar, Terence, Giles, Gustav Markkula, Jami Pekkanen, Naoki Yokota Naoto Matsunaga, Tatsuru Daimon

Towards A Space Of Contextual Effects On Choice Behavior: Insights From The Drift Diffusion Model – Wenjia Joyce Zhao, Aoife Coady, Sudeep Bhatia

Room 522ABC - Paper Session 13 – Attention

Parametric Control Of Distractor-oriented Attention – Harrison Ritz, Amitai Shenhav

Efficiency And Flexibility Of Individual Multitasking Strategies – Influence Of Between-Task Resource Competition – Jovita Bruening, Marie Mückstein, Dietrich Manzey

Asymmetric Switch Costs As A Function Of Task Strength – Markus Spitzer, Sebastian Musslick, Michael Shvartsman, Amitai Shenhav Jonathan Cohen

Individual Differences In Bodily Attention: Variability In Anticipatory Mu Rhythm Power Is Associated With Executive Function Abilities And Processing Speed – Staci Meredith Weiss, Rebecca. L. Laconi, Peter J. Marshall

Room 524A - Paper Session 14 – Cultural Cognition

Cumulative Cultural Evolution In A Non-copying Task In Children And Guinea Baboons – Carmen Saldana, Joel Fagot, Simon Kirby, Kenny Smith, Nicolas Claidiere

The First Crank Of The Cultural Ratchet: Learning And Transmitting Concepts Through Language – Sahil Chopra, Michael Henry Tessler, Noah Goodman

Seeing The Big Picture: Do Some Cultures Think More Abstractly Than Others? – Amritpal, M.P., Singh, Qi Wang, Daniel Casasanto

Conceptualization Of Cultural Diversity For Efficient And Flexible Manufacturing Systems Of The Future – Kashif Zia, Alois Ferscha, Dari Trendafilov

Room 524B - Paper Session 15 – Causal Reasoning

Limits On The Use Of Simulation In Physical Reasoning – Ethan J. Ludwin-Peery, Neil, R, Bramley, Ernest Davis, Todd, M, Gureckis

Implicit Evaluations Reflect Causal Information – Benedek Kurdi, Adam Morris, Fiery Cushman

I Know What You Did Last Summer (and How Often). Epistemic States And Statistical Normality In Causal Judgements – Lara Kirfel, David Lagnado

Politically Motivated Causal Evaluations Of Economic Performance – Zachary A. Caddick, Benjamin Rottman

Room 524C - Paper Session 16 – Distributed Cognition

The Complex System Of Mathematical Creativity: Modularity, Burstiness, And The Network Structure Of How Experts Use Inscriptions – Tyler Marghetis, Kate Samson, David Landy

Patterns Of Coordination In Simultaneously And Sequentially Improvising Jazz Musicians – Matthew Setzler, Robert Goldstone

Self-Organized Division Of Cognitive Labor – Edgar Andrade, Robert Goldstone

Bee-ing In The World: Phenomenology, Cognitive Science, And Interactivity In A Novel Insect-Tracking Task – Guilherme Sanches de Oliveira, Chris Riehm, Colin Toussaint Annand

Room 518BC - Paper Session 17 – Communication

Contextualizing Conversational Strategies: Backchannel, Repair And Linguistic Alignment In Spontaneous And Task-Oriented Conversations – Christina Dideriksen, Riccardo Fusaroli, Kristian Tylen, Mark Dingemanse, Morten H. Christiansen

Conversation Transition Times: Working Memory & Conversational Alignment – Julie E. Boland

The Effects Of Embodiment And Social Eye-Gaze In Conversational Agents – Dimosthenis Kontogiorgos, Gabriel Skantze, Andre Pereira, Joakim Gustafson

Disentangling Contributions Of Visual Information And Interaction History In The Formation Of Graphical Conventions – Robert Hawkins, Megumi Sano, Noah Goodman, Judith E. Fan

Room 519B - Paper Session 18 – Cognitive Architectures

Model-based Approach With ACT-R About Benefits Of Memory-based Strategy On Anomalous Behaviors – Shota Matsubayashi, Kazuhisa Miwa, Hitoshi Terai

A Unified Model Of Fatigue In A Cognitive Architecture: Time-of-Day And Timeon- Task Effects On Task Performance – Ehsan Khosroshahi, Dario Salvucci, Glenn Gunzelmann, Bella Veksler

Comparing Alternative Computational Models Of The Stroop Task Using Effective Connectivity Analysis Of FMRI Data – Micah Ketola, Linxing, Preston, Jiang, Andrea Stocco

On Formal Verification Of ACT-R Architectures And Models – Vincent Langenfeld, Bernd Westphal, Andreas Podelski

Room 520CF - Paper Session 19 – Learning Models

Role Of Working Memory On Strategy Use In The Probability Learning Task – Mahi K, Luthra, Peter M. Todd

An Integrated Trial-Level Performance Measure: Combining Accuracy And RT To Express Performance During Learning – Florian Sense, Tiffany Jastrzembski, Michael Krusmark, Siera Martinez Hedderik van Rijn

Statistical Learning Generates Implicit Conjunctive Predictions – Ru Qi Yu, Jiaying Zhao

Modelling Emotion Based Reward Valuation With Computational Reinforcement Learning – Can Koluman, Christopher Child, Tillman Weyde

Room 520AD - Paper Session 20 – Publication-Based Talks - Paradigms

Cognitive Chrono-Ethnography (CCE): A Behavioral Study Methodology Underpinned By The Cognitive Architecture, MHP/RT – Muneo Kitajima

From Design Cognition To Design Neurocognition – John Gero

Logicist Computational Cognitive Modeling Of Infinitary False Belief Tasks – Selmer Bringsjord, Naveen Sundar Govindarajulu, Christina Elmore

Concept Learning With Energy-Based Models Igor Mordatch

Plenary Room 517D - Glushko Awards Symposium

Kirsten C. S. Adam, University of California San Diego; Max Kleiman-Weiner, Harvard University; Martin Maier, Humboldt-University Berlin; Jean-Paul Noel, Vanderbilt University and New York University; Katharine A. Tillman, University of Texas at Austin


16:10 – 16:30

Level 5 Foyer – Afternoon Break


16:30 – 18:00

Plenary Room 517D - Jacobs Foundation Symposium: How Curious? The Need for Exploration and Discovery

Elizabeth Bonawitz, Rutgers Univ.; Tobias Hauser, University College London; Celeste Kidd, University of California, Berkeley; Allyson Mackey, Univ. of Pennsylvania; Todd Gureckis, New York University


18:00 – 19:00

Plenary Room 517D – Cognitive Science Society Business Meeting (All Are Invited and Welcome)

08:00 – 17:00

Level 5 Foyer – Registration Open


09:00 – 10:00

Plenary Room 517D - Keynote: gosci

Takeshi Okada, University of Tokyo


09:00 – 17:00

Level 5 Foyer – Exhibits Open


10:00 – 10:20

Level 5 Foyer – Morning Break


10:20 – 12:00

Room 521ABC - Paper Session 21 – Speech

Articulatory Features Of Phonemes Pattern To Iconic Meanings: Evidence From Cross-linguistic Ideophones – Arthur, Lewis, Thompson, Nicolas Collignon, Youngah Do

Linguistic Syncopation: Alignment Of Musical Meter To Syntactic Structure And Its Effect On Sentence Processing – Courtney Hilton, Micah Goldwater

Speech Processing Does Not Involve Acoustic Maintenance – Spencer Caplan, Alon Hafri, John Trueswell

Does Predictive Processing Imply Predictive Coding In Models Of Spoken Word Recognition? – James Magnuson, Monica Li, Sahil Luthra, Heejo YouRachael, J, Steiner

Room 519A - Paper Session 22 – Problem Solving

When Graph Comprehension Is An Insight Problem – Amy Fox, James Hollan, Caren M. Walker

Rapid Trial-and-Error Learning In Physical Problem Solving Kelsey, R, Allen, Kevin A. Smith, Josh Tenenbaum

An Insight Into Language: Investigating Lexical And Morphological Effects In Compound Remote Associate Problem Solving – Alexander, H, Bower, Andrew Burton, Mark Steyvers,William Batchelder

The Disappearing “Advantages Of Abstract Examples In Learning Math” – Dragan Trninic, Manu Kapur, Tanmay Sinha

Room 524A - Paper Session 23 – Thinking

Predictions From Uncertain Moral Character – Samuel Johnson, Gregory Murphy, Max Rodrigues, Frank Keil

A Friend, Or A Toy? Four-year-olds Strategically Demonstrate Their Competence To A Puppet But Only When Others Treat It As An Agent Mika Asaba, Xiaoqian Li, Wei Quin Yow, Hyowon Gweon

Who Is Better? Preschoolers Infer Relative Competence Based On Efficiency Of Process And quality Of Outcome. – Julia Leonard, Grace E. Bennett-Pierre, Hyowon Gweon

Does Video Content Facilitate Or Impair Comprehension Of Documentaries? The Effect Of Cognitive Abilities And Eye Movement Strategy – Yueyuan Zheng, Xinchen Ye, Janet Hsiao

Room 519B - Paper Session 24 – Decision Making Approaches

A Resource-Rational Process-Level Account Of The St. Petersburg Paradox – Ardavan S. Nobandegani, Kevin da Silva-Castanheira, Thomas Shultz, A. Ross Otto

Toward A Formal Science Of Heuristics – Ardavan S. Nobandegani, Thomas Shultz

Imagining The Good: An Offline Tendency To Simulate Good Options Even When No Decision Has To Be Made – Joan Danielle K. Ongchoco, Julian Jara-Ettinger, Joshua Knobe

What’s Lagging In Our Understanding Of Interruptions?: Effects Of Interruption Lags In Sequential Decision-Making – Jennifer Sloane, Christopher Donkin, Ben Newell, Garston Liang

Room 524B - Paper Session 25 – Computational Models

Modeling Ungrammaticality: A Self-Organizing Model Of Islands – Sandra Villata, Jon Sprouse, Whitney Tabor

Iconicity And Structure In The Emergence Of Combinatoriality – Matthias Hofer, Roger Levy

The Role Of Basal Ganglia Reinforcement Learning In Lexical Priming And Automatic Semantic Ambiguity Resolution – Jose, M., Ceballos, Andrea Stocco, Chantel Prat

Generating Normative Predictions With A Variable-length Rate Code – S. Thomas Christie, Paul Schrater

Room 520AD - Paper Session 26 – Word Learning and Development

Environmental Effects On Parental Gesture And Infant Word Learning – Rachael W Cheung, Calum Hartley, Padraic Monaghan

Integrating Common Ground And Informativeness In Pragmatic Word Learning – Manuel Bohn, Michael, Henry, Tessler, Michael C. Frank

Incorrect Guesses Boost Retention Of Novel Words In Adults But Not In Children – Chiara Gambi, Martin J. Pickering, Hugh Rabagliati

Modeling Individual Performance In Cross-situational Word Learning – Yung Han Khoe, Amy Perfors, Andrew Hendrickson

Room 524C - Paper Session 27 – Reasoning

Explaining Intuitive Difficulty Judgments By Modeling Physical Effort And Risk – Ilker Yildirim, Basil Saeed, Grace E. Bennett-Pierre, Tobias Gerstenberg, Josh Tenenbaum, Hyowon Gweon

A New Probabilistic Explanation Of The Modus Ponens–Modus Tollens Asymmetry – Ben Eva, Stephan Hartmann, Henrik Singmann

What Information Shapes And Shifts People’s Attitudes About Capital Punishment? Olivia A. Miske, Nick Schweitzer, Zachary Horne

Modeling Human Syllogistic Reasoning: The Role Of “No Valid Conclusion” – Nicolas Oliver Riesterer, Daniel Brand, Hannah Dames, Marco Ragni

Room 518BC - Paper Session 28 – Language Comprehension

Subjectivity-based Adjective Ordering Maximizes Communicative Success – Michael Franke, Gregory Scontras, Mihael Simonic

Children, More Than Adults, Rely On Similarity To Access Multiple Meanings Of Words – Sammy Floyd, Casey Lew-Williams, Adele Goldberg

Dark Forces In Language Comprehension: The Case Of Neuroticism And Disgust In A Pupillometry Study – Isabell Hubert, Juhani Järvikivi

Verb Frequency Explains The Unacceptability Of Factive And Manner-of speaking Islands In English – Yingtong Liu, Rachel Ryskin, Richard Futrell, Edward Gibson

Room 522ABC - Paper Session 29 – Divergent Thinking

Building Individual Semantic Networks And Exploring Their Relationships With Creativity – Matthieu Bernard, Yoed Kenett, Marcela Ovando Tellez, Mathias Benedek Emmanuelle Volle

Idea Generation And Goal-Derived Categories – Richard W. Hass, Colin Long, Joshua Pierce

Fanning Creative Thought: Semantic Richness Impacts Divergent Thinking – Roger Beaty, Yoed Kenett, Richard W. Hass

Interaction Between Idea-generation And Idea-externalization Processes In Artistic Creation: Study Of An Expert Breakdancer – Daichi Shimizu, Masaya Hirashima, Takeshi Okada

Room 520BE - Paper Session 30 – Modeling Language

Sensorimotor Norms: Perception And Action Strength Norms For 40,000 Words – Dermot Lynott, Louise Connell, Marc Brysbaert, James Brand James Carney

The Role Of Information In Visual Word Recognition: A Perceptually-Constrained Connectionist Account – Raquel G. Alhama, Noam Siegelman, Ram Frost, Blair Armstrong

Children’s Overextension As Communication By Multimodal Chaining – Renato Ferreira Pinto Junior, Yang Xu

Applying Deep Language Understanding To Open Text: Lessons Learned – Marjorie McShane, Stephen Beale, Irene Nirenburg

Room 520CF - Paper Session 31 – Publication-Based Talks - Methods

Evolution And Efficiency In Color Naming: The Case Of Nafaanra – Noga Zaslavsky, Karee Garvin, Charles Kemp, Naftali Tishby Terry Regier

Towards Emotion Based Music Generation: A Tonal Tension Model Based On The Spiral Array – Dorien Herremans, Elaine Chew

Warning: The Exemplars In Your Category Representation May Not Be The Ones Experienced During Learning – Kenneth Kurtz, Daniel Silliman

Language And Event Recall In Memory For Time – Yaqi Wang, Silvia P. Gennari

Plenary Room 517D - Rumelhart Symposium in Honor of Michelene Chi, Arizona State: Translation Research in STEM Learning

Kristy Boyer, University of Florida; Kirsten R. Butcher, University of Utah; Jodi Davenport, WestEd; Percival G. Matthews, University of Wisconsin; Jim Slotta, University of Toronto


12:00 – 13:00 Lunch Break

Plenary Room 517D – Women in Cognitive Science


13:00 – 14:30

Room 517BC – Poster Session 2 (View Poster Program here)


14:30 – 16:10

Room 519A - Paper Session 32 – Conceptual Representations

Stereotypes Of Transgender Categories: Attributes And Lay Theories – Natalie Gallagher, Galen Bodenhausen

The End’s In Plain Sight: Implicit Association Of Visual And Conceptual Boundedness – Jonathan N. Wehry, Alon Hafri, John Trueswell

Season Naming And The Local Environment – Charles Kemp, Alice Gaby, Terry Regier

The Social Network Dynamics Of Category Formation – Douglas R. Guilbeault, Andrea Baronchelli, Damon Centola

Room 524A - Paper Session 33 – Attention & Control

Individual Differences In Self-Recognition From Body Movements – Akila Kadambi, Hongjing Lu

A Mechanistic Account Of Constraints On Control-Dependent Processing: Shared Representation, Conflict And Persistence – Sebastian Musslick, Jonathan Cohen

Controlling Attention In A Memory-Augmented Neural Network To Solve Working Memory Tasks – T. S. Jayram, Younes Bouhadjar, Tomasz Kornuta, Ryan L. Macavoy, Alexis Asseman, Ahmet S. Ozcan

Hands In Mind: Learning To Write With Both Hands Improves Inhibitory Control, But Not Attention – Mukesh B. Makwana, Biswajit Boity, Prasanth P. Chandran, Amogh Sirnoorkar Sanjay Chandrasekharan

Room 524B - Paper Session 34 – Curiosity & Exploration

Pedagogical Questions Empower Exploration – Anishka Jean Emily Daubert, Yue Yu, Patrick Shafto, Elizabeth Bonawitz

Under Pressure: The Influence Of Time Limits On Human Exploration – Charley, Mingshuo, Wu, Eric Schulz, Kimberly Gerbaulet, Timothy, J., Pleskac Maarten Speekenbrink

If It’s Important, Then I Am Curious: A Value Intervention To Induce Curiosity – Rachit Dubey, Tom Griffiths, Tania Lombrozo

Preschoolers Jointly Consider Others’ Expressions Of Surprise And Common Ground To Decide When To Explore – Yang Wu, Hyowon Gweon

Room 521ABC - Paper Session 35 – Language Acquisition

The Acquisition Of French ‘Un’ – Elisabeth Marchand, David Barner

Something About “us”: Learning First Person Pronoun Systems – Mora Maldonado, Jennifer Culbertson

Children Learn Words Better In Low Entropy – Ori Lavi-Rotbain, Inbal Arnon

Modality Effects In Vocabulary Acquisition – Merel C. Wolf, Alastair Smith, Caroline Rowland, Antje Meyer

Room 519B - Paper Session 36 – Analogy

Metaphors We Teach By: A Method For Mapping Metaphorical Lay Theories – Stephen Flusberg, Bridgette Hard

Comparing Apples To Cash Flows: Structural Alignment In Financial Decision Making – Shir Dekel, Micah Goldwater, Dan Lovallo

Algebraic Patterns As Ensemble Representations – Anna Leshinskaya, Enoch Lambert, Sharon L. Thompson-Schill

Looking Patterns During Analogical Reasoning: Generalizable Or Task-Specific? – Katharine, F., Guarino, Robert Morrison, Lindsey, Engle, Richland, Elizabeth, M, Wakefield

Room 522ABC - Paper Session 37 – Reading

Character-based Surprisal As A Model Of Reading Difficulty In The Presence Of Errors – Michael Hahn, Frank Keller, Yonatan Bisk, Yonatan Belinkov

A Rational Model Of Word Skipping In Reading: Ideal Integration Of Visual And Linguistic Information – Yunyan Duan, Klinton Bicknell

To Catch A Snitch: Brain Potentials Reveal Knowledge-based Variability In The Functional Organization Of (Fictional) World Knowledge During Reading – Melissa Troyer, Marta Kutas

Individual Differences In Reading Experiences: The Roles Of Mental Imagery And Fantasy – Marloes Mak, Roel M. Willems

Room 524C - Paper Session 38 – Goals

Impatient To Receive Or Impatient To Achieve: Goal Gradients And Time Discounting – Oleg Urminsky, Indranil Goswami

Asking Goal-oriented questions And Learning From Answers – Anselm Rothe, Brenden Lake, Todd M. Gureckis

Task Goals Structure Conceptual Acquisition – Seth Chin-Parker, Eric Brown

The Goal Bias In Memory And Language: Explaining The Asymmetry – Monica L. Do, Anna Papafragou, John Trueswell

Room 525AB - Paper Session 39 – Risk in Decision Making

Risk Is Preferred At Lower Causal Depth – Jeffrey R. Parker

Why Do People Reject Mixed Gambles? – Wenjia Joyce Zhao, Lukasz Walasek, Sudeep Bhatia

A Resource-Rational Mechanistic Approach To One-shot Non-cooperative Games: The Case Of Prisoner’s Dilemma – Ardavan S. Nobandegani, Kevin da Silva-Castanheira, Thomas Shultz, A. Ross Otto

Evaluating Models of Human Behavior in an Adversarial Multi-Armed Bandit Problem – Marcus Gutierrez, Jakub Cerny, Noam Ben-Asher, Efrat Aharonov-Majar, Branislav Bosansky, Cleotilde Gonzalez

Room 520AD - Contributed Symposium 4 - Insight and the Genesis of New Ideas

Frederic Vallee-Tourangeau, Linden J. Ball, Anna Abraham, Carola Salvi, Ut Na Sio

Room 518BC - Contributed Symposium 5 - In Vivo Studies of Solo and Team Performance

Wayne D. Gray, Ray Perez, Jerad H. Moxley, David Mendonca, Jamie Gorman

Room 520BE - Contributed Symposium 6 - Symposium in Memory of Jeff Elman: Language Learning, Prediction, and Temporal Dynamics

Jay McClelland, Ken McRae

Room 520CF - Contributed Symposium 7 - Beyond Number: Towards a Unified View of Dimensional Reasoning in Perception, Cognition and Language

Pooja Paul, Anna Papafragou, Jessica Cantlon, Stella Lourenco Lauren Aulet


16:10 – 16:30

Level 5 Foyer – Afternoon Break


16:30 – 17:30

Plenary Room 517D - Rumelhart Prize Presentation: Rumelhart Prize Presentation: Translating the ICAP Theory of Cognitive Engagement Into Practice

Michelene Chi, Arizona State


17:30 – 18:30

Room 710 – Rumelhart Prize Reception & Announcement of the 19th Rumelhart Prize Recipient

08:00 – 17:00

Level 5 Foyer – Registration Open


08:50 – 09:50

Plenary Room 517D - Keynote: Cognition, Collaboration, and Creativity: Google's Material Design as a Case Study

Elizabeth Churchill, Google Research


09:00 – 17:00

Level 5 Foyer – Exhibits Open


09:50 – 10:10

Level 5 Foyer – Morning Break


10:10 – 11:00

Room 520AD - Paper Session 40 – Cross-Linguistic Analysis

Availability-Based Production Predicts Speakers’ Real-time Choices Of Mandarin Classifiers – Meilin Zhan, Roger Levy

Efficient Use Of Ambiguity In An Early Writing System: Evidence From Sumerian Cuneiform – Noah Hermalin, Terry Regier

Room 524A - Paper Session 41– Memory Challenges

Sleep Does Not Help Relearning Declarative Memories In Older Adults – Emilie Gerbier, Guillaume T. Vallet, Thomas C. Toppino, Stéphanie Mazza

A Definition Of Memory For The Cognitive Sciences – Brett, Alexander, Ross, Luis H. Favela

Room 518BC - Paper Session 42 – Computational Approaches to Language Acquisition

Modeling Children’s Early Linguistic Productivity Through The Automatic Discovery And Use Of Lexically-based Frames – Stewart M. McCauley, Morten H. Christiansen

Multiword Units Predict Non-inversion Errors In Children’s Wh-questions: “What Corpus Data Can Tell Us?” – Stewart M. McCauley, Colin Bannard, Anna Theakston, Michelle Davis, Thea Cameron-Faulkner

Room 520BE - Paper Session 43 – Language in Adults

Measuring Creative Ability In Spoken Bilingual Text: The Role Of Language Proficiency And Linguistic Features – Stephen Skalicky, Scott Crossley, Danielle McNamara, Kasia Muldner

Cognitive Aging Effects On Language Use In Real-Life Contexts: A Naturalistic Observation Study – Minxia Luo, Gerold Schneider, Mike Martin, Burcu Demiray

Room 521ABC - Paper Session 44 – Deceit

Deception In Evidential Reasoning: Willful Deceit Or Honest Mistake? – Toby D. Pilditch, Alexander Fries, David Lagnado

Designing Good Deception: Recursive Theory Of Mind In Lying And Lie Detection – Lauren A. Oey, Adena Schachner, Ed Vul

Room 524B - Paper Session 45 – Memory Recall

Rapid Presentation Rate Negatively Impacts The Contiguity Effect In Free Recall – Claudio Toro-Serey, Ian Marcus Bright, Brad Wyble, Marc Howard

Word Frequency Affects Binding Probability Not Memory Precision – Vencislav Popov, Matt So, Lynne Reder

Room 520CF - Paper Session 46 – Language in Communities

The Shape of Language Experience in Two Traditional Communities – Marisa Casillas

Tuning to Multiple Statistics: Second Language Processing of Multiword Sequences Across Registers – Elma Kerz, Daniel Wiechmann, Morten H. Christiansen

Room 519A - Paper Session 47 – Individual Differences

Individual Differences In Judging Similarity Between Semantic Relations – Nicholas Ichien, Hongjing Lu, Keith Holyoak

Ain’t That A Shame: An Exploration Into “academic” Shame And STEM Learning – Jeremiah Sullins, Collin Phillips, Lucy Grace Camp, Kailey Thornton Ashlyn Wilson

Room 524C - Paper Session 48 – Social Perceptions

Modifying Social Dimensions Of Human Faces With ModifAE – Chad Atalla, Amanda Song, Garrison W. Cottrell

Illusory Body Perception And Experience In Furries – Alexander Kranjec, Louis Lamanna, Erick Guzman, Courtney Plante Stephen Reysen, Sharon Roberts Elizabeth Fein

Room 522ABC - Paper Session 49 – Evolutionary Constraints

Inductive Biases Constrain Cumulative Cultural Evolution – Bill Thompson, Tom Griffiths

The Emergence Of Monotone quantifiers Via Iterated Learning Fausto Carcassi, Shane Steinert-Threlkeld, Jakub Szymanik

Room 519B - Paper Session 50 – Planning

Detecting Social Transmission In The Design Of Artifacts Via Inverse Planning – Ethan Hurwitz, Timothy F. Brady, Adena Schachner

People’s Perception Of Others’ Risk Preferences – Shari Liu, John McCoy, Tomer D. Ullman


11:00 – 12:00 

Plenary Room 517D - Carvalho-Heineken Prize Presentation: Functional Imaging of the Human Brain: A Window in the Architecture of the Human Mind

Nancy Kanwisher, MIT


12:00 – 13:00 Lunch Break

Plenary Room 517D – Graduate Student and Postdoc Speed Mentoring


13:00 – 14:30 

Room 517BC – Poster Session 3 (View Poster Program here)


14:30 – 16:10

Room 521ABC - Paper Session 51 - Across Languages

Differences In Learnability Of Pantomime Versus ArtificialSign: Iconicity, Cultural Evolution, And Linguistic Structure – Tania Delgado, Seana Coulson

Event Participants And Verbal Semantics: Non-Discrete Structure In English, Spanish And Mandarin – Lilia Rissman, Kyle Rawlins, Barbara Landau

Do Cross-linguistic Patterns Of Morpheme Order Reflect A Cognitive Bias? – Carmen Saldana, Yohei Oseki, Jennifer Culbertson

Jessie And Gary Or Gary And Jessie?: Cognitive Accessibility Predicts The Order In English And Japanese – Karina Tachihara, Miah N. Pitcher, Adele Goldberg

Room 524A - Paper Session 52 – Gestures

Eye See What You’re Saying: Beat Gesture Facilitates Online Resolution Of Contrastive Referring Expressions In Spoken Discourse – Laura M. Morett, Scott H. Fraundorf, James McPartland

Absolute Spatial Frames Of Reference In Bilingual Speakers Of Endangered Ryukyuan Languages: An Assessment Via A Novel Gesture Elicitation Paradigm – Rafael E. Nunez, Kenan Celik, Natsuko Nakagawa

Do People Use Gestures Differently To Disambiguate The Meanings Of Japanese Compounds? – Kei Kashiwadate, Tetsuya Yasuda, Harumi Kobayashi

Unflinching Predictions: Anticipatory Crossmodal Interactions Are Unaffected By The Current Hand Posture – Johannes Lohmann, Martin V. Butz

Room 518BC - Paper Session 53 – Cognitive Development

Tensions Between Science And Intuition In School-Age Children – Andrew G. Young, Isabel Geddes, Claire Weider, Andrew Shtulman

Developmental Changes In The Ability To Draw Distinctive Features Of Object Categories – Bria Long, Judith, E., Fan, Zixian Chai, Michael, C. Frank

Sources Of Knowledge In Children’s Acquisition Of The Successor Function – Rose M. Schneider, Kaiqi Guo, David Barner

A Comprehensive Examination Of Preschoolers’ Probabilistic Reasoning Abilities – Samantha Gualtieri, Stephanie Denison

Room 519A - Paper Session 54 – Skill Acquisition

Human Few-shot Learning Of Compositional Instructions – Brenden Lake, Tal Linzen, Marco Baroni

An ACT-R Approach To Investigating Mechanisms Of Performance-related Changes In An Interrupted Learning Task – Maria Wirzberger, Jelmer Borst, Josef F. Krems, Günter Daniel Rey

Measuring Programming Competence By Assessing Chunk Structures In A Code Transcription Task – Noorah Albehaijan, Peter Cheng

Elvis Has Left The Building: Correlational But Not Causal Relationship Between Music Skill And Cognitive Ability – Giovanni Sala, Fernand Gobet

Room 524B - Paper Session 55 – Pragmatics

The Interactions Of Rational, Pragmatic Agents Lead To Efficient Language Structure And Use – Benjamin Peloquin, Noah Goodman, Michael C. Frank

(In-)definites, (anti-)uniqueness, And Uniqueness Expectations – Nadine Bade, Florian Schwarz

Prosodic Cues Signal The Intent Of Potential Indirect Requests – Sean Trott, Stefanie Reed, Victor Ferreira, Benjamin Bergen

The Importance Of Morally Satisfying Endings: Cognitive Influences On Storytelling In Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl – Sarah Binau, Robin Melnick, Jack I. Abecassis

Room 524C - Paper Session 56 – Social Cognition

Go With Plan A: Backup Plans Help The Powerful But Distract The Powerless – Leila, Marcia, Straub, Petra C. Schmid

Moral Reputation And The Psychology Of Giving: Praise Judgments Track Personal Sacrifice Rather Than Social Good – Samuel Johnson

Structural Thinking About Social Categories: Evidence From Formal Explanations, Generics, And Generalization – Nadya Vasilyeva, Tania Lombrozo

A Conceptual Model Of Self-Adaptive Systems Based On Attribution Theory – Nianyu Li, Zhengyin Chen, Zi-Long Li, Wenpin Jiao

Room 522ABC - Paper Session 57 – Language Development

Online Phonetic Training Improves L2 Word Recognition Gerda – Ana Melnik, Sharon Peperkamp

What Syntactic Structures Block Dependencies In RNN Language Models? – Ethan, Gotlieb, Wilcox, Roger Levy, Richard Futrell

Phoneme Learning Is Influenced By The Taxonomic Similarity Of The Semantic Referents – Abdellah Fourtassi, Emmanuel Dupoux

Generic Noun Phrases In Child Speech – Samarth Mehrotra, Amy Perfors

Room 525AB - Paper Session 58 – Active Learning

Navigating The “chain Of Command”: Enhanced Integrative Encoding Through Active Control Of Study – Doug Markant

Benefits Of Active Control Of Study In Autistic Children – Nicholas Perri, Valentina Fantasia, Doug Markant, Costanza De Simone Gianni Valeri

Targeted Mathematical Equivalence Training Lessens The Effects Of Early Misconceptions On Equation Encoding And Solving – Kristen Johannes, Jodi Davenport

Active Learning For A Number-Line Task With Two Design Variables – Sang Ho Lee, Dan Kim, John Opfer, Mark Pitt, Jay Myung

Room 519B - Paper Session 59 – Spatial Cognition

Perceived Area Plays A Dominant Role In Visual Quantity Estimation – Sami, R, Yousif, Emma Alexandrov, Elizabeth Bennette, Frank Keil

Spatial Memory Of Immediate Environments – Holger Schultheis

Relative Evaluation Of Location: How Spatial Frames Of Reference Affect What We Value – Andrea Bender, Sarah Teige-Mocigemba, Annelie Rothe-Wulf, Miriam Seel, Sieghard Beller

“Natural Concepts” Revisited In The Spatial-topological Domain: Universal Tendencies In Focal Spatial Relations – Alexandra Carstensen, George Kachergis, Noah Hermalin, Terry Regier

Room 520AD - Contributed Symposium 8 - Understanding Interactions Amongst Cognitive Control, Learning And Representation

Sebastian Musslick, Abigail Novick Hoskin, Taylor Webb, Steven Frankland, Jonathan Cohen, Matthew Lambon Ralph Lang Chen, Timothy Rogers, Randall C. O’Reilly, Alexander Alexandrov Petrov

Room 520BE - Contributed Symposium 9 - What Makes A Good Explanation? Cognitive Dimensions Of Explaining Intelligent Machines

Roberto Confalonieri, Tarek R. Besold, Tillman Weyde, Kathleen Creel Tania Lombrozo, Patrick Shafto

Room 520CF - Contributed Symposium 10 - Cognitive Network Science: Quantitatively Investigating The Complexity Of Cognition

Yoed Kenett, Nichol Castro, Elisabeth Karuza, Michael Vitevitch


16:10 – 16:30

Level 5 Foyer – Afternoon Break


16:30 – 18:00

Plenary Room 517D - Invited Symposium: Creativity in the Arts

David Kirsh, UCSD; Gil Weinberg, Georgia Tech; Brian Magerko, Georgia Tech; Valentina Nisi, University of Madeira


18:00 – 18:05

Plenary Room 517D – Conference Closes

program committee

Prof. Ashok Goel, Georgia Institute of Technology
Prof. Colleen Seifert, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Prof. Christian Freksa, University of Bremen
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